Tag Archives: family

Please welcome…

12 Feb

Oliver

image

& Dave!

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Kid has been talking about adding a furry critter to our family for quite some time. I’ll admit that I have been entertaining that idea for a very long time too. 

I really wanted to adopt a rescue pup, but right now I’m barely coping with the second bout of severe iron deficiency in under 6 months (this one is non-anemic iron deficiency) . I feel lousy. Walking a dog a few times a day just is too much to ask of this sore body with it’s tired blood.

Not that these cutie pies don’t require lots of care and attention.

They need so much more EVERYTHING than I would have ever imagined, even after reading everything I could set my eyeballs on.

They do not need to be walked, though.

Everything else can be spread throught the day, especially the snuggles and playtime and the neverending supply of hay and veggies.

So far, so wonderful.

Kid is over the moon and we are all very attached to our new family members and they are settling in nicely.

For Friends/Family of Special Needs Parents:

16 Mar

I think this applies pretty well to other special needs and not just autism.

In my virtual travels, I have noticed a major theme and source of extra stress for parents of kids with special/different needs and that is that family and friends that were a part of their life before the special needs came into play (before the child/children were born, before the parents became concerned and started seeking answers…  Anytime, really…) are either no longer present or seemingly unwilling (or actually unwilling) to accept their friend’s often complex responsibilities and family challenges and maybe their friend’s increased need for someone to listen, a friend who won’t judge them, just kindness … A FRIEND.  They could really use a friend. If you still want to be a friend (and this goes for family- immediate and extended pretty equally) but just don’t know what to do, here’s a great place to start:

(I do have other links like this…I’ll update and post them when I can…)

Your Child Has Autism, and I Don’t Know What to Say: Seven Ways to Go the Extra Mile to Keep Your Friendship Thriving

via Your Child Has Autism, and I Don’t Know What to Say: Seven Ways to Go the Extra Mile to Keep Your Friendship Thriving | Delightfully Different Life.

 

Please share this resource!  Us exhausted parents of special needs kids thank you!

xo

B

Across the (autism) Universe…

8 Oct

 

 

 

Parenthood Arrays the Bravermans Across the Autism Spectrum | thAutcast.com.

 

I love this.  theAutcast.com explores how autism really exists in families.  Fantastic graphics explore how the 1 in x many is not black and white, but rather shades of gray (or blue, in this case)…

Beautifully done.

Check it out.

xo

B

p.s. I was sick yesterday and we had a lovely family dinner, this evening, with one of my favorite people, who we rarely get to see.  More later today…

Open Letter (about Asperger’s)

8 Oct

This is absolutely brilliant…

AN OPEN LETTER TO ANYONE WHO HAS EXPERIENCED MY SON’S MELTDOWNS. (click to go to McSweeney’s!)

More later… I’m attempting to not screw up a cake.

Yes. I am baking a cake.

Really?  You didn’t hear the smoke alarms go off? That’s odd.  May I suggest a good audiologist and ENT in the area?

:-)

More in a bit…

xo

Bek

Rolling Rolling Rolling….

5 Aug

You Got To Roll Me….

Originally uploaded by CleverIndie

Keep the dice a rolling

keep the game a moving

don’t ever lose that die!

Rain and wind and weather

hell bent for jenga*

wishing my bro would lose and cry…
*uses a six sided, six color die according to wikipedia.org. Yes. I checked. Would you expect less of me?
We are just getting to the point where playing board games is not eerily reminiscent of my childhood (as an only child, living in the middle of the woods, no cable, and I was the weird kid. I learned to play every game by myself. Even hide and go seek. It’s true. More on that someday. I’m just starting to own that part of me.)…

Alex will sit and play and follow directions (with a great deal of repetition on our part) for a little bit- though his attention is still somewhat short…

All of the games we have happened upon lately seem to have die or dice involved. We have been rockin’ the Monopoly Jr., Clue Jr., and Mouse Trap.

Part of the motor skill challenge has been rolling the die or dice (and actually having it change to a random side). Part of the “I have an almost 6 year old” challenge has been getting him to not pretend to roll it so that he miraculously gets 6 every time, because at almost 6 bigger always seems better even if it gets you sent back to the start of the game board.

We also tend to play around our lovely Noguchi glass coffee table as we can all sit comfortably (and my work is usually overpowering our little kitchen table…Still want my Edison farmhouse table. Someday it will be mind. Someday.) Not only is there glass, there are a few choice knick-knacks near by that are probably not-so-durable and there are two big club chairs and a love seat. My arthritis refuses to get down on the floor to retrieve overzealously thrown dice (actually it’s more of a problem evolving back into an upright position these days).

And I fear glass chips and broken knick-knacks. And face it, my kiddo is wonderful with many things, but his motor skills are a major work in progress.

So here is my solution.

I took a tin with a clear lid (the lid covering is plastic- I do not suggest trying this with a glass-topped tin) that is of the “deep” variety (I got them from SpecialtyBottle.com – the one shown in my image is a 4oz/deep). I popped the die in, closed the lid (the lid isn’t terribly loose but it is not secured outside of friction- so if you feel you need a sturdier hold try some masking or electrical tape around the edges.

And voila! Alex can shake-shake-shake and I no longer have to go fishing for game pieces, the coffee table is intact, and my curios are happy campers and have removed their helmets and safety goggles.

This also helps teach him the rules of “rolling” – he has to give it a few shakes and put it down. This has made a huge difference in his comprehension of rules- those of the game and those little social game play rules. Eventually he’ll roll by himself, but for now this lets us play and show him the joy of playing boardgames as a family. He can focus on playing and not obsessing over this one small part.

The containers are too big to squeeze into most manufacturers game boxes and I like to keep all parts in their respective boxes, so we have one “rolling” container. If he was younger and more apt to try to consume the parts during game play, we would probably secure the lid more permanently.

xo
Bek

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